Incorporating Hygge Into Your Home

There is no literal or direct translation for the Danish word Hygge (hoo-ga) but you get a sense of it during moments when you’re snuggled up in your bed while it’s raining outside, or when you’re bundled up in a blanket and you have a hot cup of coffee in your hand. It’s generally a sense of contentment and an overall feeling of wellbeing. So here’s how you can incorporate it in your home:

Incorporating Hygge Into Your Home
Design by Nicholas Spencer and Sophie Von Wedekind

Choose Monochromatic Colours

Culture Trip highly recommends that you keep things clean and simple just like how the Danes would—remember that less is more. Stick with your basic needs and decorate using multifunctional pieces of furniture. You can also add a few prints and patterns on your throw pillows, curtains, and rugs to give your home more personality. Big and soft cushions are a good investment, too.

Incorporating Hygge Into Your Home

Stick to a monochromatic colour palette. Pick neutrals, whites, and greys to give your entire home a sense of peace and calm. It will also make your space look much bigger and brighter. Warm coloured wood will also add a nice touch and it helps bring you closer to nature.

Incorporating Hygge Into Your Home

Invest in Good Lighting

Hygge is all about setting the mood and there’s no better way to do that than getting the best kinds of lighting and choosing the right colours, too. Candles and lamps are always present in hygge homes, but experts warn against using them too much and without care. Professor Peter Moller the lead author of research in Copenhagen University told The Guardian that burning candles causes a greater deal of damage similar to that of diesel exhaust fumes. What you can do instead is to get yourself some wax LED candles that have that same magical glow of candlelight minus the fire and health hazards.

Incorporating Hygge Into Your Home

You can also opt for floor and table lamps instead of overhead lighting as it creates equal areas of darkness and light—perfectly capturing the essence of hygge. Warm coloured bulbs are also a great choice, especially warm white ones with a low lumen number. If you already have a lot of overhead lighting that you cannot (or do not) want to replace, install a dimmer instead. It’s an inexpensive way to get that warm, low light ambience.

Set the Right Temperature

There’s nothing more hygge than a warm room in winter so make sure you’ve got your home’s thermostat set at the right temperature. It’s also the best time to use your wood-burning stove and fireplace. Just make sure you keep them in tip-top shape all year round so that you’re sure they’re working properly when it’s time to use them.

Incorporating Hygge Into Your Home

Although wood fireplaces are cosy, they’re quite difficult to clean. Old and poorly maintained fireplaces also pose a greater risk of house fires, not to mention an increase in air pollution. Constant exposure to wood-burning smoke can also cause asthma and bronchitis. That’s why most homeowners now prefer electric fires, as they’re easier to install and maintain. Screwfix details how electric fires offer up to 100% heat efficiency, unlike wood-burning fireplaces that can only convert 15% of the wood’s energy into useful heat. Electric fires also come in an array of designs that will suit any style of living room.

Turn Your Bathroom Into a Mini Spa

The great thing about hygge is how you can incorporate it in every part of your life. Some owners opt to have it only in their bathrooms and bedrooms, while some like it in their living room and home office. If you choose to turn your bathroom into a hygge spa, add a plush rug right outside the shower door or next to the tub. Hang a cosy bathrobe at arm’s reach, too. It’s worth incorporating more natural materials in your bathroom, as well. House & Garden recommends stripped-back wooden floorboards and shutters with a few antique and hand-carved decorations.

Incorporating Hygge Into Your Home

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